Resolution Strategies | A Monthly E-Newsletter


CONFIRMATION BIAS

On September 6, 1916, the 64th Congress of the United States passed legislation declaring that the Supreme Court shall hold one term annually, “commencing on the first Monday in October.” Today, for the second time in the past three years, the Court begins its term with less than its full complement of nine justices because the Senate has not yet completed the confirmation process concerning the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the vacancy created by the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Last Friday, after hearing from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Kavanaugh the day before, the Senate Judiciary Committee completed its confirmation hearing and referred the nomination of Judge Kavanaugh to the full Senate, pending completion of a further investigation by the FBI. Ironically, the confirmation hearing provided a case study in “confirmation bias” — the tendency to seek and give greater weight to information which supports one’s existing beliefs and theories, while ignoring or undervaluing information which tends to refute those same beliefs and theories. “Confirmation bias” also includes the tendency to interpret new information in ways which support, rather than refute, one’s existing beliefs or theories.  

LABOR PAINS

In June of 1894, amidst a deepening economic crisis, railroad employees staged a strike against the Pullman Palace Car Company to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives. Within days, members of the American Railway Union joined the “Pullman Strike” nationwide. When the U.S. government was asked to intervene, President Grover Cleveland dispatched federal troops and — after much rioting and bloodshed, including 30 deaths — the strike ended. Just six days later, fearing further conflict and hoping for a reconciliation with organized labor, Congress unanimously — ah, the good old days! — passed legislation which declared the first Monday in September to be “Labor Day.”  

MISSION: IMPASSEBLE

I’ve been a fan of Mission: Impossible — first the television series, including its remake in the ’80s, and now the movie franchise starring and produced by Tom Cruise — since the day it first aired on September 17, 1966. With “Mission: Impossible — Fallout” having opened this past weekend, what better time to revisit and update the August 2015 edition of Resolution Strategies . . .

“Good morning, Mr. Siegal:  

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